senior health

Great Activities For Seniors To Stay Active

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Senior Activities

As you age, it gets harder and harder to do the activities you used to do to stay healthy and active. Even if you can’t run five miles or go rock climbing anymore, that doesn’t mean the rest of your days are relegated to your couch. The more you stay active as you get older, the younger you will feel, and there are a number of great activities for seniors to stay active.

For some general guidelines, healthcare professionals recommend that seniors get at least two hours and thirty minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week or an hour and fifteen minutes of high-intensity aerobic activity a week. This amount of activity will help ward off heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, depression, and dementia. Aerobic activities can include walking at a brisk pace, jogging with some friends, taking a water aerobics class, or even pushing a lawn mower. Basically, anything that gets your heart rate going faster than usual and reduces the amount of time you spend watching television or doing other sedentary activities.

Unfortunately, daily activities like shopping, cooking, and housework don’t count as aerobic activities, but there are ways that you can turn these into strength-building exercises through functional fitness. Functional fitness is an exercise regimen that involves doing exercises that mimic daily activities like lifting a heavy bag of groceries or getting in and out of a low chair. By strengthening the muscles you use for these activities, you can minimize your chance of injuring yourself while making it easier to do these sorts of activities on a regular basis by yourself. You’ll be better able to go grocery or clothes shopping, go out to eat, or any number of other things that can increase your feeling of independence.

If you’re feeling especially spry, you can even try yoga to stay social, strengthen muscle, and keep your joints flexible.

While getting older isn’t always easy, it doesn’t have to be debilitating. At MD Home Health and MD Home Assist, we recommend incorporating these great activities into a weekly routine to help you feel young, healthy, and independent.


Strength Training for Seniors

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Strength Training Tips for Seniors

As we age, our bodies take on a toll of the burdens we’ve put our bodies through over the years. Aging doesn’t mean that we should stop working out altogether, rather, we should strive to be at our best even in our later years. Here are some top strength training tips to get started on a regiment of building up muscle strength.strength

#1) Stand in front of a chair, then alternate repeatedly between sitting and standing. Don’t plop down; lower into the chair with control every time.

#2) Practice pushups, modified to your comfort level such as knees on floor, or standing pushup in which you’re pushing off a wall or railing. Remember to go at your own pace, and to only do as much as you’re comfortable with.

#3) Squats with light hand placement on secure object for balance. Don’t push yourself too hard, if you feel like you need to take a break, or stop and catch a breath, do what your body is telling you to do.

#4) Deadlifts: The deadlift is when you stand before a barbell that’s on the floor or a tracked device such as a Smith machine. Keeping legs nearly straight (slightly bent knees), you bend at the hips, keeping back slightly arched. Do not hunch your back. Bend over just enough to pick up the barbell. Usually, palms face away from you, but they can face forward.

Keeping legs nearly straight, back slightly arched, arms nearly straight (do not lock out elbows, but don’t bend arms, either), pull the weight up as you return to your start position. That is one repetition.

#5) Leg presses: It’s best to do these on a leg press machine, and to keep your back straight. It’s also helpful to remember to exhale as you push out.

The detriment of not doing strength training is a result in a loss of muscle, beginning at around age 30. This starts occurring in people who don’t do strength training – structured weight-bearing workouts. This muscle loss equates to about five pounds per decade. So even though an elderly woman may still be able to “fit” into her wedding dress of decades past, her body composition has radically changed if she’s been losing five pounds of muscle every decade!

Keep these strength training tips in handy, and remember to that should you or your loved one require assistance, to get in touch with one of our qualified caregivers at www.mdhomehealth.com