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How to Lower Stress (Part 2)

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Knowing how to lower stress is useful because everyone deals with it. According to a Psychology Today post, stress is simply a reaction to a stimulus that disturbs our physical or mental equilibrium.

No one is exempt. It doesn’t matter how happy their profiles pictures look on Facebook or how many Tweets they post about their “perfect” relationship. Everyone gets stressed out at some point. Some people just hide it better than others.

The trick is to learn how to lower stress.

Bob Greene shared a list of foods that help relieve stress in an article on oprah.com.

Other mood enhancing foods include sunflower seeds, as well as fruits and vegetables with orange and yellow pigments, such as papaya. Papayas, along with red bell peppers, contain vitamins A and C and folate, which increases energy and repairs cell damage caused by stress. Stress-reducing herbs include basil and arugula.

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In addition, foods you may want to stay away from include caffeinated beverages, trans fatty acids, sugar and alcohol. Caffeine raises stress hormone levels, while trans fat comprises your immune system, which increases stress on the body. Sugar and alcohol both affect the adrenal glands, which protect your body against stress.

How to Lower Stress (Part 2) brought to you by MD Home Health

Keep this in mind during your next trip to the grocery store. If you know someone who is suffering from stress, feel free to share these tips. By teaching others how to lower stress, you may be making a huge difference in their lives and the lives of the people they associate with. Sometimes stressed out people make others stressed out by simply being around them and giving off that negative energy.

If you or a loved one is suffering from long-term or chronic stress, be sure to contact a doctor to get more information on how to lower stress.

If you’re seeking help, MD Home Health Home Assist provides both medical and non-medical home care and can offer you a free in-home consultation!

 


How To Lower Stress (Part 1)

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Learning how to lower stress can be a very difficult task.  Stress can be both mentally and physically draining, so it is important to do what you can to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Here are a few steps you can take to lower your stress levels:

Identify the source of your stress.

Your stress could be caused by lack of sleep, an upcoming exam, unemployment or problems with your relationship. Sometimes your stress can be caused by multiple factors, so it is important to determine what exactly the cause is. If you don’t know what the problem is, how can you fix it?MDLowerStress2

Create solutions for each source of stress you have identified.

For example, if you are stressed about an upcoming exam, develop a study chart. Break down your studying time into sessions to decrease the likelihood of becoming overworked. Try joining or creating a study group. Be sure not to procrastinate. Leaving everything until the last minute is sure to spike your stress levels.

Add some relaxing activities to your day.
Try joining a yoga class or purchasing a DVD to workout at home. If you find yourself getting overstressed, stop what you’re doing and count to ten, while breathing deeply. Meditating is also a great way to soothe your mind and body. If you’re not the quiet type, even some calm and relaxing music or nature sounds can do wonders. Play this in your car on your way to work. It may help keep you relaxed during rush hour traffic.MDLowerStress

Try implementing the above-mentioned tips on how to lower stress. Remember that while some stress is normal, long-term or chronic stress can wear you down and cause serious issues.

According to a WebMD article, there are emotional, physical, cognitive and behavioral symptoms that occur because of stress.

Ongoing, chronic stress can lead to serious health problems, including mental health problems, cardiovascular disease, obesity, menstrual problems, sexual dysfunction, skin and hair problems and gastrointestinal problems.