Inspiration

How To Have More Positivity in 2019

mdhomehealthadmin Inspiration Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The challenges of caring for an elderly parent can often be daunting to say the least, especially if you’re trying to hold down a job and raise a family at the same time. If your senior loved one requires a good amount of care, it can be difficult to maintain a positive attitude and keep yourself on an even keel. That being so, you sometimes need to step back from caregiving and think about doing some things that will help to improve your outlook, so you don’t become bogged down with a perpetually sour disposition.

Build in personal time   

It’s very easy to have virtually every minute of the day allotted to caring for kids, husband, and your parent, in addition to satisfying job requirements or household needs. This makes it important to take some time and make a list of what’s most important to you in your life, and prioritize these things. Don’t let caregiving consume valuable time with your spouse and children, and make sure to schedule some down time for yourself – whatever it is that brings you peace of mind, and respite from the daily routine.

Accept help from others

If you have siblings in the area, enlist their aid in caring for your elderly parents. If you don’t feel they’re contributing in an appropriate manner, call a family meeting and express your feelings on the subject. You may also be able to have friends help out, or to get help from the community, since many towns and cities offer social programs and other opportunities for seniors to get together and enjoy each other’s company.

Smile more

This probably sounds too simple to be effective, but you’d be surprised at how positive an effect the mere act of smiling more can have on a person. It can literally change your mood entirely, and if you smile at someone, you can help to change their mood as well. You might even start a chain reaction in your circle, and have everyone smiling. It’s an infectious act, and it all tends to improve people’s attitudes.

Be grateful

One of the best ways to avoid negativity and give yourself an uplifting moment is to think about all the really great things in your life, and be grateful for them. Sure, caregiving for your parents can be a hassle, but if you focus more on what a wonderful spouse and children you have, or how you love the work you’re doing at your job, the troubles associated with caregiving can fade into the background.

Make time for exercise

There’s no way to overstate the value of including exercise time in your daily schedule – find a way to make this work. In addition to the health benefits, regular exercise is a known stress buster, and if caregiving has become a source of stress for you, this may be the very best way to overcome that stress. Exercise also releases endorphins into the bloodstream, which are the ‘feel good’ hormones of the body, which can lift up your mood and make you feel better about everything in your life. Whatever else you have to do in your busy schedule, including vigorous exercise each day is an absolute must.

Don’t go it alone

Don’t let your elderly parent feel like they have to be alone facing each day. MD Home Health has caregivers that can brighten the day up for every senior person they come in contact with. Our Phoenix home health caregiving provides the perfect mix of companionship and home assistance to keep your elderly parent happy and enjoying the highest quality of life possible.


10 Books Caregivers Need To Read

mdhomehealthadmin Caregiver Information, Inspiration Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A survey conducted by the National Alliance for Caregiving, in tandem with AARP, discovered that there are nearly 70 million caregivers in the US who are obliged to provide some kind of care for least one individual who is disabled, ill, or elderly. Of course, not all of these are professional caregivers like those at MD Home Health, and they might even be relatives of the person needing care, but still the total number of caregivers in this country is staggering.

One of the issues made clear in this survey result was that a large number of these caregivers felt overwhelmed or somewhat helpless by the task which they were obliged to perform, and many expressed the need for more information and greater skills. One of the best ways to actively address this situation is to delve into the treasure trove of health-related and caregiving books available to interested readers. Here are 10 of the best books, which you might want to use to upgrade your skills and increase your understanding of caregiving best practices.

“Chicken Soup for the Soul: Family Caregivers: 101 Stories of Love, Sacrifice, and Bonding” by Joan Lunden and Amy Newmark

Many caregivers are inspired by reading about how other people in similar situations have managed to sacrifice and provide needed care to others, while persevering against all manner of challenges. Co-author Joan Lunden includes 101 stories which chronicle the specific things faced by some family caregivers in helping their love ones enjoy a greater quality of life.

“Our Bittersweet Season: Caring for Our Aging Parents – and Ourselves”, by Jane Gross

Jane Gross is a former New York Times reporter who has provided in this book a kind of how-to primer for dealing with elderly care in the US, including Medicare and the general system as well. It’s also a personal memoir about how the author managed to care for her own aging parents, written with brutal candor that everyone can relate to.

“The Caregivers Survival Handbook: How to Care for Your Aging Parent Without Losing Yourself”, by Alexis Abramson

Being a member of the ‘sandwich generation’ can be very frustrating for a woman these days, because it means you’re providing care to for both young children and aging parents. In the midst of all that, you’re probably also under-appreciated as a person yourself. Much of this book deals with how you can cope with the stresses involved with this dual care arrangement, in the face of maintaining a healthy work/home life balance.

“While They’re Still Here: A Memoir”, by Patricia Williams

Many people in America are confronted with the same situation presented in this book, which is that of a daughter suddenly forced into the role of becoming the only caregiver for aging parents. Struggling with all the challenges of her own personal life, the author discusses how she learned to provide care for her elderly loved ones with courage and with grace.

“Living With Dying: Complete Guide for Caregivers”, by Katie Ortlip and Jahnna Beecham

A very informative and practical book for caregivers, this volume provides easy-to-follow recommendations for treating various medical conditions and symptoms, and having those difficult conversations with your elderly loved ones.

“The Spectrum of Hope: An Optimistic New Approach to Alzheimer’s disease and Other Dementias”, by Gayatri Devi

In the midst of all the gloom surrounding dementias such as Alzheimer’s disease, the author provides a glimmer of hope for those caregivers facing the challenge of an afflicted elderly loved one. The book covers hopeful topics like maintaining independence, and positive communications with those suffering from dementia.

“Caregiver Defined: Words That Honor the Work of the Caregiver”, by Michael Fortuna

In this volume, the author paints a very positive image of caregivers who provide needed assistance for loved ones, including some heartfelt recollections of his own experience. This is an inspirational peon to the thankless task which many caregivers undertake every day in America.

“Beyond Forgetting: Poetry and Prose About Alzheimer’s disease”, by Holly J Hughes

This is a compilation of the work of more than 100 authors who are also medical professionals and family caregivers. Each one has contributed a special reflection on someone they know who is afflicted by Alzheimer’s disease, and every contribution is touching in its own way.

“A Gradual Disappearance”, by Elizabeth Lonseth

The author provides a Christian perspective on family caregiving, which is infused with much of her own experience on the subject, as she cared for several relatives who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. It provides a number of key insights on how to cope with all those behaviors manifested by dementia patients.

“No Saints Around Here: A Caregivers Days”, by Susan Allen Toth

This memoir by the author showcases her own caregiving experience for her spouse who was afflicted by Parkinson’s disease. The gut-wrenching challenges which she faced, right up until the end are vividly chronicled, along with her own practical suggestions for coping with it all.

Phoenix Health Care assistance

Many of the challenges faced by family caregivers are also managed by our professionals at MD Home Health and MD Home Assist, and as respected members of the Arizona Health Care network, our caregivers are always ready and willing to take on new challenges for our clients. Contact us at your earliest convenience, so we can discuss home health care for your loved one or for yourself.

 


20 Caregiver Quotes That Will Inspire You

mdhomehealthadmin Inspiration Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , ,

Caring for others is thought to be at the very summit of human emotion, and why the practice of caring elevates each of us to a place above our ordinary existence. While caring for a loved one is rewarding and life-affirming, it can also be a trying time. Sometimes we need a little inspiration to get us through those difficult days. We compiled 20 inspirational caregiver quotes that we hope inspire you.

The Quotes

  1. “Caregiving often calls us to lean into love we didn’t know possible.” ― Tia Walker, from The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love
  2. “You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the things which you think you cannot do.” — Eleanor Roosevelt
  3. “It is not how much you do, but how much love you put in the doing.” — Mother Teresa
  4. “Family is not an important thing. It’s everything. —Michael J. Fox, actor
  5. “The closest thing to being cared for is to care for someone else.” – Carson McCullers
  6. “Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.” – Leo Buscaglia
  7. “The simple act of caring is HEROIC.” – Edward Albert
  8. “Compassion brings us to a stop, and for a moment we rise above ourselves.” — Mason Cooley
  9. “Forgiveness is not an occasional act: it is an attitude.” — Martin Luther King Jr.
  10. “Although the days are busy and the workload is always growing, there are still those special moments when someone says or does something and you know you’ve made a difference in someone’s life. That’s why I became a nurse.” — Diane McKenty
  11. “To care for those who once cared for us is one of the highest honors.” – Tia Walker
  12. “No matter what you’ve done for yourself or for humanity, if you can’t look back on having given love and attention to your own family, what have you really accomplished?” – Lee Iacocca
  13. “Family is the most important thing in the world.” – Princess Diana
  14. “Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world. For indeed, that’s all who ever have.” – Margaret Mead
  15. “One person caring about another represents life’s greatest value.” – Jim Rohn
  16. “Compassion automatically invites you to relate with people because you no longer regard people as a drain on your energy.” — Chogyam Trungpa
  17. “Be determined to handle any challenge in a way that will make you grow.” — Les Brown
  18. “Some days there won’t be a song in your heart. Sing anyway.” — Emory Austin
  19. “God gave burdens; he also gave shoulders.” — Yiddish Proverb
  20. “No matter what the relationship was between the parent and child—whatever it was—this is going to be extremely challenging because it is not logical. There’s no way to deal with it rationally or directly. You don’t reason it out. What I’ve said to so many people is: we always must lead with our love.” ― Dr. Stephen Hoag

Inspired professionals at MD Home Health

Arizona health care professionals have the kind of caring and compassion which is at the heart of each of the quotations above. When you want that kind of care for your senior loved one, contact the caregivers from MD Home Health, and provide the very finest in home health care to the persons in your life who mean so much to you.