senior lifestyle

Finding the Humor in Hospice


Isn’t one of the best things to do in life to laugh at ourselves? If we have no sense of humor, then who are we? Although we in no way are claiming that hospice care is anything to joke Read more

Animal Therapy Benefits for Hospice Care


We have heard of therapy puppies and cats but never a therapy duck! Meet Webster, the mallard duck that wandered into Johnston’s WesleyLife as the new pet therapy volunteer. What is so interesting about Webster is that you can Read more

Home Health Care to be Revolutionized with Smartwatch Technology


Watches are in and they are no stranger to helping people out; especially home health care patients. It seems as though necklaces aka life alert systems are a thing of the past thanks to Samsung and their recent partnership Read more

Home Health Care to Get "Uberized" in the Future: What Does This Mean?


Improvements in technology seem to be bettering the quality of everything in life these days when it comes to convenience and control. In an attempt to “uberize” the healthcare system, well-known company Axxess, intends on appealing to the convenience Read more

Finding the Humor in Hospice

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Isn’t one of the best things to do in life to laugh at ourselves? If we have no sense of humor, then who are we? Although we in no way are claiming that hospice care is anything to joke about, of course, one man and his good friend decided to poke fun at the home health care system and inevitabilities of death in a playful way.

93-year-old Harry Azoff, accompanied by his hospice volunteer, Morgan Thompson, set out to lift some light into the subject of aging and hospice with their “Hospice-tality” play addressing Azoff’s “impending death.” Only 30 minutes long, the play plucked at the heartstrings of Azoff’s family and friends telling stories of his life with musical hints tied in done by his favorite music therapist, Molly Hicks. Even plays on words of the ever-famous and dreaded Grim Reaper were well-received by his hospice friends. “Have you ever seen cartoon drawings of the Grim Reaper? How can anyone take that guy seriously,” his character asks in the short play. And, we have to agree, the whole manifestation of death carrying a massive scythe is a little over-the-top now that we think about it.

Finding the Humor in Hospice

Besides living a very full life, Azoff has miraculously outlived his doctors’ estimates after being diagnosed with kidney disease; maybe it’s all of the humor circulating in his veins. Although neither Azoff nor Thompson has any professional playwriting or singing experience, the two made ballads until the cows came home and enjoyed every minute of it. To make the story even more heartfelt, as if it could be, Thompson is blind in one eye and has impaired vision in the other making it almost impossible for her to even see Azoff. “Maybe I can’t see people’s physical bodies as well, but I can see their souls better,” she said. “Harry has a beautiful, beautiful spirit inside of him,” she told the Herald.

Creating joke-upon-joke of various hospice visits between himself and Thompson, they poked fun at the typical jargon spoken between patient-and-professional like “Are you having any pain issues since I saw you last?” To which Azoff would respond with “Not unless you count existential pain.” Although the two are very aware that Azoff’s time is coming to a close like their curtain eventually had to, Thompson stated to the Herald Tribune that she finds peace helping Azoff share his story. And, what a beautiful story it is.

Phoenix home health care professionals can help you with more advice or questions you may have. For more information on our services, experience, or rates, call (602) 396-5742 or fill out our contact form. We look forward to serving you.


Nutrition for Seniors

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As we get older, it becomes more and more important for us to take extra care of ourselves. Nutrition for seniors is especially vital to keep their bodies strong, minds sharp and energy levels up. Eating a healthy, well-balanced variety of foods is an excellent way to prevent and control health problems now and in the future.

Nutrition for Seniors by MD Home Health

1. Fruits and vegetables

Stadler recommends choosing from the darkest reds and deepest greens for a strong dose of vitamins and antioxidants. She also suggests blueberries, red raspberries, dark cherries and dark, leafy vegetables. Stadler stated, “When it comes to nutrients, frozen is just as good as fresh.”

2. Dairy

Dairy provides you with a great source of calcium and vitamin D. Low-fat or nonfat milk, yogurt and cheese are great options to choose from.

3. Whole grains

Whole grains are a good source of B vitamins and fiber and a key component in nutrition for seniors. According to the Whole Grains Council, whole grains can cut pre-diabetic conditions, decrease body fat, reduce stroke risk, lower the risk of many chronic diseases and much more.

4. Meat

Try to avoid going the Fred Flintstone route by consuming ridiculous amounts of red meat. Try to stick with leans meats like skinless chicken and turkey breasts. Although fried chicken can be tasty, it can also be a health hazard. Baking your meat is a great and healthy alternative to fried foods.

5. Fish

Fish oil is a great source of omega-3 fatty acids and is normally excluded from multivitamins. There are tons of great recipes available, but if you’re not a seafood person, try fish oil pills.

In order to maintain good nutrition for seniors, use this list as a guide toward a healthier eating lifestyle.

Also, be sure to check out MD Home Health Home Assist for great home health services and more tips on nutrition for seniors. Your health is essential. Don’t hesitate to seek help if you require it.


Aging and Fitness

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As the years go by, each workout seems a little more painful then the last.  The running and lifting that used to come easy now leaves our bodies winded and sore.  However, this should not be a reason to stop exercising.  Aging and fitness go hand-in-hand, and continuing to exercise can lead to a better quality of life especially for adults and the elderly.yoga

Fitness is amongst the best anti-aging tools that we have.  Exercise can help prevent health related problems that occur later in life. Exercise such as weight lifting and aerobic activity can help lower the risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and depression.  By lifting weights or performing weight-bearing exercise, adults can increase bone density and reduce fractures that can lead to less hospital visits and home care.  Aerobic exercise can lead to lower cholesterol, therefore decreasing health related problems and need for medication.  With aging and fitness, exercise can lead to a happy and healthy aging process as long as adults continue to make it a regular habit.

So, what exercises should adults tend to lean toward as they become older to avoid injury?  Older adults should tend to do more low-impact activities.  Some of the better low-impact exercises are walking, swimming, cycling, lifting weights, and yoga.  Walking is easier on adult joints and can be done practically anywhere.  Swimming can help improve endurance, flexibility and conditioning.  Cycling aides with building muscle and endurance.  Lifting lighter weights can also help older adults build muscle and strength.  Finally, yoga can increase muscle without putting unnecessary strain on the body.  Yoga classes can typically be found at gyms or studios around the community.

So although exercise can be painful at times, adults should continue to maintain a regular regime. A good regime can have positive results on the aging and fitness process.

As always, adults and the elderly should consult a professional or a physician before starting any new exercise regime.  For information or questions regarding aging and fitness for the elderly contact MD Home Health / MD Home Assist at 602.266.9971 or visit their website at www.mdhomehealth.com.