Home Health Phoenix

Celebrate National Hobby Month


Hobbies can be a lot more than just time-filling activities that pass the day for you and your senior loved one. AZ Health Care professionals point out that having a hobby can be something that relieves a great deal Read more

Cold and Flu Prevention Tips for Seniors and Caregivers


There's no doubt about it - we're right in the middle of the cold and flu season, and we still have weeks to go before the season fades away into springtime. Arizona health care professionals tell us that seniors Read more

How exercise may help with slow Parkinson's


A new study published in JAMA Neurology this week has the potential to dramatically impact one aspect of senior health care: Parkinson’s disease. Clinical trials showed that those who have been recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease may be able to Read more

How to age gracefully


Aging doesn’t have to be something to dread or fear.  Although our bodies and minds do change over time, you can age with grace and have some fun while you’re at it. Here are a few tips to stay Read more

How exercise may help with slow Parkinson’s

MD Home Health Active Living, Articles, Senior Lifestyle Leave a comment   , , , ,

A new study published in JAMA Neurology this week has the potential to dramatically impact one aspect of senior health care: Parkinson’s disease. Clinical trials showed that those who have been recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease may be able to dramatically reduce its progression through strenuous treadmill exercise. Alternatively, less strenuous exercise for those who have Parkinson’s does not stop its progression.

Parkinson’s Disease and Its Challenges

Parkinson’s disease, a progressively degenerative neurological disease involving motor control problems, so exercise can be potentially dangerous. Though the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can be controlled by medication, it is currently incurable, and the drugs used to manage the disease eventually lose their efficacy over time.

How exercise may help with slow Parkinson's

Because medications will ultimately fail patients, researchers have been looking for new solutions in symptom management, with exercise being one of the treatment options. What’s promising about these findings is that if Parkinson’s is caught early enough, and exercise is used as an intervention in Parkinson’s beginning stages, the disease may not only be slowed down significantly and delay the use of medication, but exercise may change the trajectory of the disease altogether, postponing the worst symptoms.

Studying Exercise as a Treatment Option in Clinical Trials

Researchers from institutions such as Northwestern University and the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Medical Campus investigated whether exercise would be a viable treatment option for Parkinson’s. Although there were animal studies which have shown the results of exercise on Parkinson’s in rodents—a reduction in symptoms and a delay in physical deterioration—those results were not yet shown in humans.

Other forms of exercise and physical activity, including cycling, dancing, and boxing, may have shown promise to help those who are suffering from Parkinson’s, but the studies had inconsistent results as well as used multiple kinds of exercise instead of measuring and comparing specific exercises.

And that’s what this study did in a Phase II clinical trial, using exercise as a treatment in comparison to medication, measuring the efficacy and safety of exercise in different doses. In this study, the researchers recruited 128 women and men with Parkinson’s diagnoses within the last five years. No one had been exercising regularly nor had they been taking medication for Parkinson’s symptoms.

It’s worth noting that the study was not designed to show the effectiveness of intense exercise in comparison to moderate exercise. But what has been surmised from this study is that strenuous exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which in turn slows brain deterioration and boosts overall brain health.

What’s needed now is Phase III clinical trials to test this hypothesis out. But while that study is being organized, a high-intensity exercise routine may be something for those who have recently been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. If you or a loved one has been recently diagnosed, consult with your physician first before embarking on any exercise routine.

If you are looking for senior health care or home care in the Phoenix area, contact us today. We have home health care options that can be tailored to your needs and budget.


How to age gracefully

MD Home Health Active Living, Articles, Senior Lifestyle Leave a comment   , , , ,

Aging doesn’t have to be something to dread or fear.  Although our bodies and minds do change over time, you can age with grace and have some fun while you’re at it. Here are a few tips to stay forever young and to improve your health care.

Live Well

This may go without saying, but maintaining a healthy lifestyle is one surefire way to age well.

This involves avoiding unhealthy habits such as excessive salt, sun exposure, and watching television, any smoking, and drinking too much.

This also involves embracing healthy habits such as regular exercise, keeping your blood pressure on target, getting enough rest every night, and maintaining a healthy weight and cholesterol levels.

Stress can age you prematurely, so try to keep stressors at bay through self-care practices such as exercise meditation and seeking support from a mental health counselor or psychologist.

How to age gracefully

Give Your Brain a Workout

Keep your mind agile with brain games such as crossword puzzles. Even if you or a loved is in their 70s or 80s, taking up mentally-stimulating activities can slow and reverse the mental declines that typically come with aging.

It’s not just puzzles that can keep a brain fit. Believe it or not, blogging can be helpful. Sharing your life experience and the wisdom you’ve gained in a blog can help you with both active and passive thinking.

Soak Up the Sun

Although increased skin exposure to the sun will increase your chances for skin cancer, you don’t have to be out for long to get the vitamin D that your body naturally creates through the sun.

Vitamin D is good for strong and healthy bones, but it also helps your immune system, increases calcium absorption, regulates the growth of cells, and protects from certain cancers, bone diseases, and diabetes.

It can be easy to get your daily dose of vitamin D (400 IUs) from a supplement, or from fatty fish, fortified milk, and eggs. But it you can typically get a day’s worth of vitamin D from spending just 20 minutes day outside.

Note: the more melanin you have, the longer you will need to be outside–but even getting outside every day for some needed fresh air can do wonders for your health and mood.

Fill Up on Folate

Folic acid isn’t just for pregnant women. Studies have shown that low levels of folate can increase your risk of diseases such as depression and dementia.

You can get folate quite easy from your diet by adding beans, dried peas, citrus juices and fruits, and green, leafy vegetables.

If you’re not sure if you have low folic acid levels, some symptoms include forgetfulness, headaches, digestive issues, and irritability.

Stay Positive

You know how the saying goes, “You’re only as young as you feel.” If you’re dreading aging, then that’s what you can easily focus on. Studies have shown that what can better predict how healthily you age is your resiliency, your attitude, and your stress response—more than disability or physical disease. Even in the dark clouds of your challenges, you can find a silver lining.

Taking care of an aging parent or loved one can be a stressful experience. But you do not have to endure it alone. We take senior health care very seriously, and as one of the top home health care companies Phoenix, you can rely on our expertise and professionalism for your health care needs. Contact us today to learn more.