healthy eating tips

Healthy Summer Snacks to Help Keep You Hydrated, Cool and Slim


Summer is right around the corner. Many people associate summer with cold beers and hanging out by the pool to keep cool. However, the foods you eat can have a large effect on how you feel in the heat Read more

Natural Ways to Fight Depression This May


Depression is the most common form of mental illness. As much as 26% of the adult population in the United States suffers from depression. Since 1949, Mental Health America has observed that May as Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental Read more

The Benefits of Exercise and an Active Lifestyle


May is National Sports and Physical Fitness month. Now is a great time to spread awareness of the many benefits provided by engaging in an active lifestyle. Many Americans don't get enough exercise in their day to day lives. Read more

7 Ways Gardening Can Extend Your Life


In honor of April being National Garden Month, and this beautiful spring weather, we’d like to share some of the amazing health benefits gardening can bring into your life. Gardening is so healthy that it could, in fact, add Read more

The Benefits of Exercise and an Active Lifestyle

mdhomehealthadmin Active Living, Healthy Eating, Senior Lifestyle Leave a comment   , , , , , ,

May is National Sports and Physical Fitness month. Now is a great time to spread awareness of the many benefits provided by engaging in an active lifestyle. Many Americans don’t get enough exercise in their day to day lives. An active lifestyle can improve your mood, promote social interaction and even increase the longevity of your life. If you are someone who is not getting enough physical activity, here are a few reasons why now is great time to make some positive changes in your life.

Make Small Changes

Don’t set yourself up for failure when starting to make changes to your lifestyle. It’s not always easy to break out of comfort zones. Set small goals first, and make small accomplishments. Encourage family and friends to join in your physical activity, like taking a walk together or going for a bike ride. Getting active is a great way to build lasting friendships and build a sense of community. Communities can work together to create opportunities for everyone to be lead a more active lifestyle.

Improved Heart Health

Heart disease and stroke are leading causes of death in the United States. However, just two and half hours per week of moderate aerobic workout can improve you heart’s health and lower your risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke. Maintaining a regular active lifestyle can also improve your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Improved Mood and Mental Health

Regular physical activity can reduce the risk of depression. It can also help keep your cognition skills sharp as you age. Sharper motor skills can reduce the risk for falls and injuries. An active lifestyle can help boost endorphin production in the brain, resulting in a happier mood. An active lifestyle can even help you sleep better naturally as well.

Control your Weight

Scientific evidence shows that physical activity can help manage weight gain over time. The exact amount of physical activity varies from person to person. However, an average of 150 minutes per week of moderate aerobic exercise and a healthy balanced diet is a great recipe to manage caloric intake and manage your weight.

There are many health benefits of exercise, and even more creative ways to engage in some form of physical activity. Even for individuals who are home bound or have physical limitations, Phoenix home health care professionals provide a variety of in home physical therapy and training. For more information on our services, experience, or rates, call (602) 396-5742 or fill out our contact form. We look forward to serving you.


5 Thanksgiving Day Diet Hacks

mdhomehealthadmin Healthy Eating, Seasonal/Holiday Leave a comment   , , , , ,

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and that means family and friends will be gathering together, giving thanks for their blessings, and feasting on approx. 4,500 calories each.  That’s two to three times what the average person needs in an entire day. So how does one enjoy this long celebrated tradition without overdoing it? With these handy dandy Thanksgiving Day health hacks. Now you can have your cake, and eat it.

More Lemons Please

Research shows the body must maintain a slightly alkaline pH balance for optimal health. Most people may not realize the pH balance of what they’re eating. It would be well worth the read to sit down and view a food pH balance chart. In the meantime, know that raw fruits and vegetables are most likely to be alkaline, while processed foods, sweets, meats, sodas, dairy and grains tend to be acidic. One can balance out the high acidity levels in their body by adding lots of fresh lemon to their water. Water is neutral in pH, and lemons are as high on the alkaline scale as it gets. Another high alkaline substance is baking soda, but lemons are much more delicious. You can also balance your body’s pH by drinking a shot of organic apple cider vinegar. This tastes better if you dilute it with water, and if you have a straw–use it, as the vinegar can wear away at the enamel of your teeth.

Eat More Veggies

There are likely to be many tempting indulgences available at the table this Thanksgiving, but if you want to maintain a healthy diet, it’s best to load your plate up with as many veggies as possible. A good rule of thumb is to fill your plate 2/3 of the way with veggies, and the rest of your plate with things like turkey, pie, and anything else you choose. If you want to get more alkaline from your veggies, gravitate toward the green leafy kinds like spinach and kale, as they have higher alkaline levels than most. Also, know that canned veggies are acidic, so if you want to stay healthy, go fresh.

Cut it in Half

If your eyes tend to be bigger than your stomach, and you want to try everything your Thanksgiving Day feast has to offer, start by cutting everything in half. Only take half the portion size you think you want. This is especially important for dessert. Chances are that by the time you have finished eating your half-sized portions, your body will tell you that you’re full. It takes about 20 minutes after being full for the signal to reach your brain.

Slow Down

It’s best to eat as slowly as possible. If you eat your meal in less than 20 minutes, you could be overstuffing your stomach, which will only lead to discomfort later. Try chewing slowly, taking breaks between bites, and conversating with others. Another way to ensure you are eating slower is by using chopsticks.

 Say No to Alcohol

At least while you’re eating. Research has shown that drinking alcohol while eating slows down digestion, and disrupts the way the body breaks down calories. This could cause you to feel fuller longer.

If you’d like more health tips, or a Phoenix home care provider to plan meals, shop, and cook for you, give us a call  at 602-396-5742, or fill out our contact form. We look forward to helping you through our Phoenix home health care non-medical services.


Get Ready for Fall with these Healthy Seasonal Recipes

mdhomehealthadmin Healthy Eating, Seasonal/Holiday Leave a comment   , , , ,

Gourmet traditional holiday apple pie sweet baked dessert food w

With fall fast approaching, it’s time to go through your recipe catalog and bring out some of your healthy fall favorites so you can enjoy seasonal recipes that are both delicious and good for you. Included in this sampling of healthy seasonal offerings are some that you may not already have, but are definitely worth preparing, so you and your family can enjoy good eating during the coming season.

Phoenix care-givers and care receivers alike will also love these recipes, because they’re great for all ages, and use heart-healthy ingredients. Whether you provide Phoenix home health care, or enjoy the benefits of that care, preparing one of these recipes will be a pleasant experience, and you’ll end up with something really satisfying and delicious to eat.

Zucchini rice casserole

This recipe includes chicken broth, zucchini, bell peppers, onion, Jack cheese, corn, flower, turkey sausage, reduced-fat cream cheese, and pickled jalapenos, to create a heart-healthy and extremely tasty casserole that the whole family will enjoy. You can prepare this dish over two days by doing most of the work ahead of time and refrigerating it before the final bake the next day.

Deep-dish apple pie

To make this healthy version of an old favorite, you’ll need flour, sugar, salt, unsalted butter, reduced fat sour cream, canola oil, Granny Smith apples, brown sugar, lemon juice, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, flour, sugar, and one egg. First you need to make the crust, separating into two equal portions for the top and bottom. The pie filling calls for the apples, spices, and lemon juice to be combined and cooked until the apples begin to break down, then put into your baking dish with the top crust covering. Bake at 375 for about 20 minutes – then prepare yourself for a delicious taste treat.

Chicken breasts with chive sauce

This is a very simple dinner dish to prepare which doesn’t even involve baking, and it’s very heart-healthy so you don’t have to feel guilty about all that great taste. The recipe calls for four boneless chicken breasts, a little salt, flour, olive oil, two large shallots (chopped), dry white wine, reduced-sodium chicken broth, reduced-fat sour cream, Dijon mustard, and one bunch of chopped chives. After flattening and tenderizing the chicken breasts, sauté them until golden brown in the oil. Then cook the shallots in a saucepan, and add the flour, wine and broth. Add in the chicken breasts, and cook on the stovetop until all pink is gone, after which you can stir in the sour cream, mustard, and chives.

Southwestern three-bean and barley soup

For this zesty and satisfying soup, you’ll need onion, celery, carrot, reduced-sodium chicken broth, pearl barley, dried black beans, Great Northern beans, kidney beans, chili powder, ground cumin, dried oregano, and salt. After heating the oil, add in the onion, celery, and carrot, then cook them until softened. Add in water, broth, barley, all three beans, and the spices, then simmer over high heat. After allowing the mixture to simmer for about two hours, add in more water as needed, and serve to your very grateful family members!

More about home care

If you or anyone you know would benefit from having expert Phoenix home care, you should contact us at your convenience to learn more about what we have to offer, and how we can help you. For more information on our services, experience, or rates, call (602) 396-5742 or fill out our contact form. We look forward to serving you.


8 Simple Ways to Stay Healthy Through the Holiday Season

mdhomehealthadmin Healthy Eating, Seasonal/Holiday Leave a comment   , , , ,

8 Simple Ways to Stay Healthy Through the Holiday Season

It can be difficult to stay healthy during the holidays with the plethora of treats, parties, stress and emotional triggers the season brings. Not to fret! We’ve developed 8 simple ways to boost spirits and keep our health in check this year.

Carry Plenty of Snacks

As the holidays near, we’re bombarded with festive temptations wherever we turn. From treats offered by family and friends to parties and social gatherings, food often becomes a focal point of celebration. Having healthy and ready-to eat-snacks—such as raw veggies, fruit and nuts—are great ways to be prepared for the urge to indulge.

Eat Several Meals

One of the most effectives ways of combating these temptations is by eating six small meals throughout the day, rather than skipping meals to save up for one big feast. In order to keep our metabolic rates high and curb our sugar and fat cravings, it’s best to eat several small meals or snacks throughout the day.

Indulge in Only Special Treats

If you have a certain holiday treat you look forward to every year, don’t skip it! Simply hold off on most of the other goodies. Indulging in only select specialties gives you a taste of the holidays without the risk of triggering a chocolate binge from trying to abstain.

Stay Active

It’s always best to maintain an active lifestyle, and this is especially important during the holidays.

Staying active and getting at least 30 minutes of exercise per day is the best way to beat holiday blues and weight gain. It can even lower symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

Go Easy on Liquid Calories

It’s easy to pack on extra pounds due to holiday beverages like eggnog, sugary juices, alcohol and sodas. Not only can alcohol pack a ton of calories, but it also affects the way calories are burned off when ingested. Consider having just one glass of wine or bubbly, rather than overdoing it, and try the same approach with eggnog and juices. You’ll thank yourself for it a few hours later.

Eat Before the Party

If you’re planning on attending a party where there will be plenty of indulgent temptations, try eating before the party. If you fill up on a healthy meal before the festivities, you’ll be less likely to overindulge on the party favors.

Take the Focus off Food

So much of the holidays revolve around food, yet there are so many other traditions that we can focus on. Taking some time to focus on other aspects of the holidays can help curb overeating due to boredom and displaced energy.

Try putting your time and efforts into decorating, making homemade gifts, singing carols, or charity work for those less fortunate. You could even start a holiday project to keep your mind focused and occupied.

Help Others

People sometimes struggle through the holidays, be it financially, emotionally or both. Helping out friends who may be having a difficult time is always beneficial to not only the friend, but your overall happiness and stress levels.

Donating is another way to lend a helping hand. A study was conducted where people were given $100 with the option of donating or keeping it. Results showed that those who kept the money had higher levels of stress and cortisol. Those who donated the money were ultimately happier, as it activated the reward center of the brain.


Have Your Turkey and Eat it, Too: 500-Cal Thanksgiving Day Meal

mdhomehealthadmin Healthy Eating, Seasonal/Holiday Leave a comment   , , , , , ,

For so many of us, Thanksgiving is a time to spend with family and friends, give thanks for our many blessings, eat, drink, watch football, be merry, and did I mention eat?

Feasting until our stomachs nearly burst has become a common tradition for many as we kick off the holiday season. But while we’re used to eating until we can’t possibly eat anymore, is this really the best way we to celebrate our blessings? While it’s true that food is a blessing, it can also be a curse if we overeat or abuse it like a drug. That’s why we’ve found a remedy this year: the 500-calorie Thanksgiving Day meal.

Research by the University of Adelaide and the University of Connecticut show that food that’s high in fat and sugar triggers the same pleasure center of our brains that methamphetamines or cocaine would.

These foods stimulate the neurotransmitters of the mesolimbic pathway—particularly dopamine—thus giving us a “high” and actually leading us to feel addicted to food. That’s one of the reasons it’s so difficult to only eat one potato chip. This also contributes to a typical Thanksgiving Day meal packing in around 4,500 calories, according to the Calorie Control Council—significantly more than the 1,500 calories recommended for females and the 2,000 calories recommended for males, says registered dietician Mary Ellen Herndon.

Herndon further suggests a Thanksgiving Day feast should only occupy 1/3 of these calories. That leaves us with 500-700 calories to work with. While this may seem impossible, the lovely folks at Spark People, Live Science, Women’s Health and Pinterest have compiled some healthy holiday tips, as well as delicious low-calorie recipes for everything from meals and side dishes to desserts; helping keep this holiday’s indulgences on track with your personal health goals.

The best way to keep calories below 500-700 is to start with filling half of your plate with low-starch vegetables and greens. This should then be accompanied by a 3-oz portion of turkey (lean meat, as it’s lower in saturated fat). The rest of the plate may be filled with small ½-cup portions of your favorite trimmings.

Some suggestions for cutting calories on sides is to replace the green bean casserole with steamed green beans; cranberry jelly with real cranberry relish; mashed potatoes with roasted sweet potatoes or squash; rolls with cornbread; gravy with a light apple cider vinegar gravy; and traditional stuffing with a healthy alternative made from fruit and veggies.

You can also try new recipes for healthy, low-calorie side dishes. The links above contain several additional tips and recipes to try. A healthy alternative to pie or other desserts can also help lower the calorie count, as can substituting cooked and mashed cauliflower for potatoes or root vegetables, and even replacing all uses of butter with garlic, herbs and chicken or vegetable stock for flavoring.
So there you have it! We hope we’ve given you all the tools you’ll need to enjoy your holidays without the stress of overeating. Don’t forget to reach out if you’d like more tips or advice this year!


In the Mood for Healthy Food

mdhomehealthadmin Uncategorized Leave a comment   , , ,

Healthy Food for a Healthy Mood

mood healthy eating, mood food healthy foodEating healthy is not always easy. Constant temptations for inexpensive, convenient fast food make it difficult to make the right food choices when it comes to your health. Luckily, we’re here to help make it easier, because you don’t have to be a celebrity health nut or experienced chef to start choosing the best foods for your body. 

Your path toward healthier eating starts with leafy greens. The problem that people often run into with vegetables, however, is not so much the flavor but the difficulty that comes along with trying to cook them. For busy people on the go, leafy greens are easy to leave out. An effortless way to incorporate darker greens into your diet more is to start using them in your sandwiches instead of iceberg lettuce. Many of these darker greens have antioxidants like lutein and zeaxanthin, which are associated with eye health, in addition to vitamin K, which is good for bone growth and warding off cancer.

Though whole milk may provide you with your necessary intake of vitamin D and calcium for your bones, it also contains an unhealthy amount of fat, and is therefore probably not your healthiest choice. Other dairy products like yogurt have less fat and can provide you with these essential bone-fortifying nutrients while protecting your gums against disease and helping with your digestion. For a healthy breakfast that can easily replace a quick bowl of sugary cereal, consider adding flaxseeds and granola to your yogurt to get both heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and fiber.

Fish like salmon and trout will also give you a healthy dose of omega-3s that will offer the added benefit of improved brain health. Though fish might seem like a hassle to prepare at first, grilling it with a few herbs and spices should take no more than ten to fifteen minutes. Plus, its versatility gives you a range of options when considering what to do with your leftovers. You can have a classic grilled salmon dinner or a delicious grilled salmon sandwich for lunch (don’t forget your leafy greens!). For an extra healthy treat, try substituting a high-fat, high-sugar dessert with fruits that are just as sweet but also rich in vitamin C. Following some of these simple tips from the experts at MD Home Health will put you on the path to a healthier you.