aging healthy tips

Home Health Care to be Revolutionized with Smartwatch Technology


Watches are in and they are no stranger to helping people out; especially home health care patients. It seems as though necklaces aka life alert systems are a thing of the past thanks to Samsung and their recent partnership Read more

Home Health Care to Get "Uberized" in the Future: What Does This Mean?


Improvements in technology seem to be bettering the quality of everything in life these days when it comes to convenience and control. In an attempt to “uberize” the healthcare system, well-known company Axxess, intends on appealing to the convenience Read more

Alzheimer’s Patients Find Way Around Memory Loss Through Babysitting


There may just be hope for those that suffer from the gradual effects of Alzheimer’s and we have babies to thank for it. A new study in Australia has revealed that “spending a moderate amount of time caring for Read more

Healthy Summer Snacks to Help Keep You Hydrated, Cool and Slim


Summer is right around the corner. Many people associate summer with cold beers and hanging out by the pool to keep cool. However, the foods you eat can have a large effect on how you feel in the heat Read more

March is National Nutrition Month

mdhomehealthadmin Active Living, Caregiver Information, Healthy Eating Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March is National Nutrition Month, which is an education and information campaign created annually by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. This year’s theme strives to help people manage their weight successfully and reduce their risk of chronic disease while promoting general health. Consuming fewer calories, getting daily exercise and making educated food choices are part of this year’s goals. There are many easy ways to engage in a healthy lifestyle.

Cut the Calories Without Going Hungry

 Cutting down on calories is an easy way to feel better and prevent unnecessary weight gain. There is more to reducing caloric intake than just simply  “eating less.” Making simple choices in what foods you eat is easier than depraving yourself from eating. Eating plenty of fruits and vegetables over processed snacks and red meat is a healthy way to cut calories. Snacking on fruit before every meal is a great way to reduce cravings and eat more sensibly at meal time. Try an apple 15 minutes before lunch to curb a ravenous appetite.

Daily Exercise

 Daily exercise is important for a healthy cardiovascular system. Elevating your heart rate for 20 to 30 minutes a day is a clinically researched way to promote heart health. If you are someone who needs home assistance, one of our processional caregivers would be glad to assist you with an exercise routine. Strengthening therapy is just one of many medical services provided by our Phoenix home health care professionals.

 Informed Decisions

 Making educated food choices is important to a healthy lifestyle. Make sure to know your body’s caloric and nutritional needs by talking to your doctor or a health care professional. Eating organic food is a great way to provide wholesome nutrition to your body without the risk of contamination from toxic pesticides. Eating a plant based diet is also a great way to cut down on calories and give your body the nutrition it needs. Cut down on processed and packaged foods and stick to the ones that can be found at local farmers’ market.

Cutting calories, daily exercise and making informed decisions when buying food are all stepping stones to a healthy lifestyle. The food we eat is directly connected to how we feel and the health of our bodies. Let this National Nutritional Month be an inspiration to start some new healthy habits. To find out more about our Phoenix home health services, experience, or rates, call (602) 396-5742 or fill out our contact form. We look forward to serving you.


The New 80/20 Rule: Exercising vs. Dieting

mdhomehealthadmin Healthy Eating, Senior Lifestyle Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , , , ,

Have you heard of the new 80/20 rule for getting and staying healthy?

While you may be familiar with the 80/20 rule for a healthy diet, research suggests there’s more to healthy weight loss than just eating healthy 80% of the time and indulging in less healthy food 20% of the time. 

Exercise is part of the new 80/20 rule, and while many believe 80% of getting healthy relies on physical activity and 20% on diet, registered dietician Katherine Isacks says it’s actually the other way around.

The truth of the matter is that 80% of our weight correlates with what we eat and the recipe is still 80% healthy and 20% indulgent food, according to Rose Erickson at Livestrong.

Now that we can have our cake and eat it too, does that mean we should immediately go and spend an hour at the gym vigorously trying to burn it off? Studies suggest exhausting ourselves at the gym for an hour or every per day doesn’t actually prompt more weight loss.

Research conducted at the University of Copenhagen suggests that those who instead engage in moderate exercise routines are setting themselves up to achieve greater weight loss results than those who jump into vigorous workouts at the gym. This study focused on three groups of young males who were healthy, but inactive: the control group that didn’t change their diet or exercise habits; the moderate group that participated in 30 minutes of exercise per day; and the intense group that added an hour of exercise per day.

The study extended throughout the course of 13 weeks. As predicted, the men who made no changes experienced no change to their weight or physique. However, the following results may surprise you.

While the intense group of men that worked out for an hour per day lost an average of five pounds each, the men who engaged in moderate exercise of 30 minutes per day actually lost an average of 7 pounds each.

How could greater weight loss results be achieved from doing half the amount of exercise?

Each group tracked what they ate during the study, and reported on their overall activity levels throughout the day. Those among the intense workout group tended to eat more, as their bodies were prompted to replace the 600 calories they had burned. They were also less active during the day when not working out.

The moderate exercise group only burned 300 calories per day, and reported higher levels of sustained energy. This group was more active throughout the day; engaging in positive lifestyle changes more readily, like taking the stairs and walking.

They also didn’t report much change in their eating habits, as they weren’t burning enough to prompt a surge in hunger. The intense group did gain more muscle, however, which weighs more than fat.

This new research sheds light on specific misconceptions regarding diet and exercise, and shows that it isn’t necessary to overexert ourselves at the gym.

Rather, moderate exercises prompted increased energy and less temptation to overeat. While this study failed to compare results over time, this is a good model for jump-starting your own fitness plan.

Moderate levels of exercise, combined with a diet that’s 80% healthy and 20% indulgent, may be the recipe to better health.